Little Ossies and Foundation Blog 2014

From Little Things Big Things Grow

Mathematical Memories

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This week in Little Ossies we have had lots of opportunities to measure and compare items in the world around us.

It started on Tuesday when we visited the oval garden and had a chat with our special school kitchen garden expert, Simone.  Simone had a special fruit with her from a Bunya-Bunya Pine Tree which she showed to us. It was HUGE!

Simone showed us the size of the Bunya-Bunya Pine fruit. It was huge!

Simone showed us the size of the Bunya-Bunya Pine fruit. It was huge!

We all got to have a feel of the outside of the fruit.  it felt bumpy and it also had blobs of a waxy substance on it which the fruit makes to protect itself.

We all got to have a feel of the outside of the fruit. it felt bumpy and it also had blobs of a waxy substance on it which the fruit makes to protect itself.

Then Simone showed us the nuts (seeds) inside the fruit. They were very hard.

Then Simone showed us the nuts (seeds) inside the fruit. They were very hard.

Simone told us how indigenous Australians used to gather the Bunya-Bunya Pine Nuts, cook them on a fire, then grind them into flour to make things like pancakes.

Simone told us how indigenous Australians used to gather the Bunya-Bunya Pine Nuts, cook them on a fire, then grind them into flour to make things like pancakes.

Having heard this the Little Ossies wanted to make their own Bunya-Bunya flour, but we didn’t have a fire to cook the nuts on, so we had to suffice with finding out more information about the tree. When we were with Simone, she showed us a gum tree in our playground which was about half the size of the Bunya-Bunya Pine Tree.  The Gum tree was really tall, so we could only imagine how tall the Bunya-Bunya Pine could grow.

Simone was lovely enough to send a few of the nuts back to the classroom with us.  There was talk of planting a seed, but we're not sure that it will grow very fast.

Simone was lovely enough to send a few of the nuts back to the classroom with us. There was talk of planting a seed, but we’re not sure that it will grow very fast.

So we decided to try to find out.  We started measuring out the 40 metres which the Bunya-Bunya Pine can grow to, however, we didn’t really have the proper measuring equipment to do this.  We will have to borrow a “trundle wheel” from another grade to find out how far 40 metres is.  So instead of measuring a tree, we did some measuring of ourselves lying down.

We drew around each other and looked at the different sizes that we were on the ground.

We drew around each other and looked at the different sizes that we were on the ground.

We could make different sizes by the way that we lay down on the ground.

We could make different sizes by the way that we lay down on the ground.

On Thursday we had some cardboard rabbit ears brought to the classroom by a parent of a grade 4 student.  To make the ears fit we had to work out ways to make them fit heads.

With lots of tape and trial and error the Little Ossies worked out how to fit the ears to different heads.

With lots of tape and trial and error the Little Ossies worked out how to fit the ears to different heads.

Sometimes we had to fix up the size which we had made to fit heads better.

Sometimes we had to fix up the size which we had made to fit heads better.

And some ears fit perfectly.

And some ears fit perfectly.

Little Ossies really enjoy using maths in everyday life.  What measuring, sizing or comparing did you do this last week?

3 Comments

  1. That bunya bunya fruit is huge! Great measuring work Little Ossies, well done – you are so clever!

    Love from Mandy – Holly Lewis’s mummy 🙂

  2. Such exciting Maths and Science. We are most impressed! You can borrow our metre rulers and keep flipping them over and over till you reach 40 if you’d like to try. Mr Heron has a very long tape measure and he is quite a kind and sharing sort of person so we’re sure that he would be happy fo ryou to use that as well to measure your tree size.

  3. How interesting! Very clever measuring Little Ossies. I wonder how far you’ll have to walk with the trundle wheels to measure 40 metres? Keep up the great maths work 🙂

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